Exhibitions
 
Hong Kong
 
 
 

 

Hong Kong:Works by Wilson Shieh::05.06.16 – 30.06.16

A showcase of Wilson Shieh’s works from 2008-2013, surveyed are numerous threads of Shieh’s practice. Although Wilson Shieh is known for his gong-bi technique, it is also important to note his experimental treatment of other media, such as acrylic, color pencil and wood block prints which has allowed the artist to develop an expansive practice of motifs and concepts.

Exhibited are works from the Fitting Room series, in which Shieh explores the androgynous body; broad shouldered and small waisted - interchangeable for both his male and female characters. With these doll-like bases, he weighs on them with an exterior of individual hairstyles, faces, and apparel imbued with heavy questions on gender dynamics, culture, and identity. Like in painting a naked woman to play the strings of a naked man in “Music Families”, or the adornment of weaponized femininity in “Butterfly the Ninja”, his fixation on women and their higher power comes across in a great deal of his work. However, the women dressed head to toe in glass in “Glass Curtain Sisters” say more about Hong Kong than themselves.

In finding grounds for his identity and culture, he collects, assembles and disassembles celebrities, movies, and other icons of Hong Kong that have become the major building blocks that accumulated into what is our local culture. Often alluding to the familiar child-like aesthetics of paper dolls or old-fashioned decorative posters, these illustrations echo his previous focus on bodies and the separate exterior. This estranged visual organization indexes not only his pop cultural influences but also his influences as an artist. Being one of Hong Kong’s most established contemporary artists, his place constantly oscillates between the global and local Hong Kong market, and like a typical Hongkonger between China and the rest of the west. Thus forming a body of work colorful in Hong Kong and western references.

Exhibition period:  
05.06.16 – 30.06.16

Opening Hours: 
Mon – Sat: 10:30 am – 6:30 pm

Sun: 2:30 – 6:30 pm

Venue:
osage hong kong, 4/F, 20 Hing Yip Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong

 

 

Hong Kong:Business as Usual (The Day After Ground Zero)::05.06.16 – 30.06.16

Artists: Alvin Zafra, Bea Camacho, Felix Bacalo, Jenifer Wofford, Louie Cordero, Maria Taniguchi, Mike Arcega, Ringo Bunoan, Victor Balanon

The artists featured in the showcase navigate the inherited cultural horizons between the inward and outward currents of the Philippines, working with irony, satire, appropriation, and transgression. The instinct of burning down existing structures, ways of thinking and perception, in order to start afresh, is juxtaposed with that to find the space between the existing and yet to exist languages to describe what could and should be. 

Using live bullets, Alvin Zafra etches out on sandpaper portraits of martyrs and executioners. Each portrait uses up one round of bullets.

Bea Camacho disassembles extracts from Jean-Paul Sartre’s “The Imaginary”, cutting up the text, only to re-structure paragraphs alphabetically. The text is chosen for its description of the nature of human consciousness and imagination. The artist states, “I am interested in a personal narrative and the idea of memory, absence and loss that come from personal experience, but I try to veer away from an over-sentimental representation towards an analytical and perhaps scientific approach. I see it as rationalization of intangible complexities.”

Felix Bacalor’s “I Didn’t Know What I Was Doing but I’m Glad that it’s Done”, consists of scorched books – referencing the immaterial, the aftermath, and the imprint of sensations that linger in the mind after the reception of a work.

Jenifer Wofford’s “Nurse” series confronts our perceptions of stereotypes, as pertaining to the ‘pious’, ‘caring’ Nurse, fleshing out this image to include the personalities behind the occupation and the associated social standings.

Louie Cordero’s filters pop culture imagery through his subconscious into abstract paintings reminiscent of designs by the Memphis group, referencing colors of Jeepneys, and the similar improvised layers of forms.

Maria Taniguchi’s diptychs, “Untitled Mirrors” draws the association of a universe composed of fragments and bytes. Composed of a backdrop resembling a galactic, expansive space and flat fields of reductive color, the work references the mirror as a threshold between the intangible and the tangible, familiar and unfamiliar, becoming and unbecoming. 

Mike Arcega takes a humorous approach to the history of colonialization with a scaled down version of a Spanish galleon made entirely out of Manila folders. Manila folders were chosen as the material, as they are made from a native Philippine plant – the very same plant that produced the strongest known fiber and was monopolized by the Spanish armada. In this way, Arcega “[recontextualises history without divesting it of its relevance and repercussions.” (Ronald Achacoso, Futuramanila. Hong Kong: Osage, 2010).  

Ringo Bunoan’s “Hurry and Delay: Self Portrait as Penelope” consists of steel wool knitted into a cascading, reflective tapestry.

Victor Balanon’s raw ink on paper graphic illustrations oscillate between a fantastic and stark depiction of urban life in the slums of Manila.

What underlies all of the gestures and methods of critique and transgression is an overture of – perhaps, not hope – but of sending a message out in a bottle, a means of surviving in the present. 

The title of the exhibition is taken from Ronald Achacoso’s essay, Futuramanila (Hong Kong: Osage, 2010).

Exhibition period: 05.06.16 – 30.06.16

Exhibition period:  
28.12.2015 – 23.01.2016

Opening Hours: 
Mon – Sat: 10:30 am – 6:30 pm

Sun: 2:30 – 6:30 pm

Except the following days with special opening hours:

Open to special appointments during these times.

Venue:
osage hong kong, 4/F, 20 Hing Yip Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong